The coronavirus has changed the way that small businesses are operating all over the world. As the situation continues to evolve, businesses are updating the way they meet, communicate, advertise, and deliver their products and services.

Keeping employees and customers safe while continuing to make money is the top priority of almost every small business owner today. They are achieving this by shifting to a virtual environment, reinventing themselves, and outsourcing to save money. For some businesses, the pandemic has generated a huge boom, and they are running at top speed to keep up.

Here, we will discuss four ways that the coronavirus has changed small business:

More business is being done online

To reduce the risk of spreading the virus, businesses have canceled or postponed many in-person meetings, conferences, and events. For essential meetings, businesses are going virtual. Online meetings are relatively inexpensive and easy to set up, and they enable businesses to continue operating without putting employees and clients at risk.

Retailers have been moving online for years, but during the pandemic, they had to get even more creative to stay competitive while their brick-and-mortar stores are closed. Small boutiques are creating online presences, and many grocery stores that didn’t have online shopping, now have it.

While some industries have been shifting online for years, some just recently began doing so. Chefs and music instructors are now teaching mostly online, and many colleges are going completely virtual for the school year.

Most businesses are pivoting to get through the crisis

A new survey found that 92 percent of businesses have reinvented themselves in at least one way during the coronavirus pandemic. For some, this means shifting their offerings to stay afloat, while other businesses are adopting new online and offline delivery channels.

Clothing retailers are now selling masks in addition to more casual apparel to wear around the house. Farmers and fishermen who previously sold to supermarkets and restaurants are now selling directly to consumers. Lastly, retailers of all types are mirroring restaurants and adding curbside pickup options.

Some businesses are busier than ever and overwhelmed with work

Although many businesses are struggling because of the pandemic, some have seen the opposite effect. The companies that are fortunate enough to be flourishing mostly experienced rapid growth, leaving business leaders overwhelmed.

To help keep up with their increased call volume, many businesses are opting to outsource to a telephone answering service. An answering service frees up their time to focus on managing their business, while also making sure that current and potential customers won’t slip through the cracks.

More businesses are outsourcing to save money

While it’s undeniable that some tasks will always require in-house employees, there are many things that can be done by virtual receptionists. Since the COVID outbreak, many small businesses have turned to us for extra assistance in answering calls, email marketing, appointment management, disaster recovery, and more.

Money is tight for many businesses, and they cannot afford to hire another employee even if they are busy. Outsourcing to a live receptionist answering service eliminates the cost of hiring, equipment, benefits, and a salary. Instead, you only pay for the calls your virtual receptionist takes.