6 Ways the Coronavirus Will Change Business Forever

The coronavirus pandemic of 2020 is changing how the world thinks about personal space and safety. Worldwide quarantines have forced businesses to adapt and try new practices. Inevitably, some of the innovations adopted to deal with the emergency will change how businesses operate on a day to day basis. With 93% of small businesses reporting that the virus will impact how they operate, here are six ways that we expect business to change forever:

  1. There will be more remote options for employees.
  2. There will be less business travel and more remote meetings.
  3. Brick and mortar establishments will look different.
  4. Some industries will fizzle out, and new ones will thrive.
  5. Online shopping, curbside pickup, and delivery is here to stay.
  6. The use of temporary and part-time workers is up.

There will be more remote options for employees.

One of the first strategies to deal with the pandemic was to send people home. Businesses have discovered that employees can handle many functions without coming into the office. In the future, organizations may take advantage of remote technology to reduce the size and expense of maintaining a large physical workspace.

There will be less business travel and more remote meetings.

Remote meetings have quickly become a standard part of life during the pandemic. People began using platforms like Zoom for everything from professional meetings, to doctor’s appointments, to birthday parties, and happy hour gatherings. Continuing to employ remote meetings will reduce the cost and environmental impact of business travel. It also takes far less time to set up a Zoom meeting than to coordinate a physical gathering.

Brick and mortar establishments will look different. 

The businesses that maintain a physical location will have to change their practices. They may need to invest in larger buildings to encourage physical space between employees. Especially in the period immediately after the pandemic, employees showing up to work may have to go through a wellness check before entering the building.

In the retail world, shops may limit the number of patrons who can enter at any one time. They may require customers to have their temperature taken before they are allowed to enter. There will also be more separation between employees and shoppers. For example, the plexiglass shields separating cashiers from customers will probably stay in place for several years.

Some industries will fizzle out, and new ones will thrive. 

The way that consumers behave has been changing for some time. There was already a strong movement from public entertainment venues like movie theaters to private, streamed viewing services. The habits formed during the coronavirus will also affect public venues like gyms in favor of online workout providers and at-home gym equipment.

Online shopping, curbside pickup, and delivery is here to stay

There has been a growing trend towards online shopping for the past decade. During the coronavirus pandemic, consumers discovered the vast array of online possibilities. Although some will miss going out to a restaurant, others will enjoy the convenience of curbside pickup. Older people are realizing the ease with which they can have their groceries delivered directly to their homes. Establishments that fail to develop some form of online presence will be at a great disadvantage in the future.

The use of temporary and part-time workers is up

Some companies that have seen a surge of business during the pandemic have quickly hired temporary or part-time employees to help keep up. The process of recruiting, hiring, and training these employees can be costly and time-consuming. If your business is looking for extra help with tasks like customer service, phone management, and appointment setting, consider outsourcing to a call answering service.

When you partner with an answering service, you can get started almost immediately, only pay for the calls they actually take and turn it off when you no longer need it.