According to a Millennial Generation Research Review, Millennials are not only more likely to use their smartphones, but 80% of them sleep with them in their beds.

Keep in mind – they aren’t talking on their phones – they are using apps, browsing the web and texting. In fact, many see calls as an interruption into their daily lives. For the younger generation, making a call without email first can feel invasive.

However, just because millennials aren’t using the phone for making calls doesn’t mean they shouldn’t be. For a generation used to communicating by text, it’s important to learn the keys of spoken communication. It can be intimidating for Millennials to handle a call “live” with other people. Since their dominant form of communication is typically through text, they may need to practice talking on the phones.

Even for non-Millennials, telephone anxiety can be a real and frightening thing. Here’s how to overcome problems with making phone calls no matter your age. According to Heidi Grant Halvorson, social psychologist and author of “No One Understands You and What to Do About It,” there are a few simple steps to take to make calling less stressful and more effective:

Start off with a question.

In today’s text messaging world, telephone calls can sometimes be seen as invasive and interrupting so it’s best to start with a question. It sets the stage for a warm conversation and lets the listener know that you care about them. You come off warmer and more trustworthy – and it can help put off your own anxiety and make you more comfortable during the entire call.

Think about what you’ll say – but not too much.

Experts recommend that you skip writing out a script unless it’s a really important conversation. While it’s important to get the basics points down, too much planning can increase anxiety and make the conversation more difficult. Don’t overthink it because you don’t give other people the chance to express themselves in return.

Take a growth mindset.

Halvorson recommends viewing shifting perspective on phone calls and seeing any missteps as an opportunity for growth, not as a reason to beat yourself up. Spending time doing an evaluation of what can go better next time and then move on to relieve anxiety.

With a little practice, anyone – millennial or older – can get over phone anxiety. Even though texting and messaging may be more common these days, great phone etiquette never goes out of style.